South Fredonia and Pilar Streets in Downtown Historic Nacogdoches

South Fredonia and Pilar Streets in Downtown Historic Nacogdoches

South Fredonia and Pilar Streets in Downtown Historic Nacogdoches

The white tower buildings of the Texas Farm Products Company (estab.1930) may
be seen in the distance at the end of South Fredonia on the left side of this picture.
Coming this way after crossing the railroad tracks is the Nibco Manufacturing
Company (estab.1942) (not visible). There are a number of older homes on
South Fredonia, some Victorian styled in this early residential section of Nacogdoches.
Banita Park South is next, location of some of the festivals in Nacogdoches.
A car crosses the bridge over Banita Creek and to the left in the foreground
is the large parking lot of Regions Bank formerly the Stone Fort National Bank.
On the right midway down South Fredonia is the Maria A. Davidson apartments,
a historic building in the Spanish mission style designed in 1928 by Diedrich Anton Rulfs,
(1848--1926) the architect who built most of the early structures on the town square
in historic Nacogdoches. Ahead of Maria A. Davidson is the Nacogdoches Fire Museum.
The General Mercantile and Old Time String Shop sits on southwest corner of South
Fredonia and Pilar street where the historic Roberts House once existed. The Coca
Cola commercial mural is the only large outdoor art work in downtown Nacogdoches,
but there are several paintings of this type around the city associated with Mexican
restaurants. Looking west On Pilar Street beyond the String Shop is Nacogdoches'
Central Fire Station and the Municipal Building. The green building with the
second story porch, now Pilar Street Antiques, is the George F. Ingraham Building
constructed in 1897. It is the oldest building in this block and appears in some
of the earliest photographs of the town square. The three story Baker Blount Building
was erected in 1918 on the site of Nacogdoches' second court house which was torn
down in 1916. Frank S. Aikman and John Lewis Needham had this building constructed
to produce and market Mahdeen Hair Tonic which occupied the third floor.
Over the years the first and second floors were used by various automobile dealerships
and later by the Wyatt Offic Supply Co. The last building in the block on Pilar
Street displaying the nine flags of Nacogdoches is Nacogdoches City Hall,
originally the old Liberty Hotel constructed in 1891 on the site of General Sam Houston's
first home in Texas. The south wall of the two story Hoya Building located at the northwest
corner of Pilar and South Pecan Street, seen far right in the middle of the picture, retains
the original architectural details given to it by Diedrich Rulfs, but the face of the building has
been altered by various businesses that have occupied it over the past 75 years.
Currently, there is a collection of some of the earliest photographs of historic
Nacogdoches displayed in the windows of the Hoya Building. Pilar Street, named after
the early Spanish mission "Nuestra Senora del Pilar de Nacogdoches," was home to
such prominent Texas heroes as Sam Houston, Thomas J. Rusk and Adolphus Sterne.
Fredonia Street is named after the Fredonian uprising of 1826, an unsuccessful
attempt by Haden Edwards, Adolphus Sterne and others to establish an independent republic.


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