The Sitton Log House at Millard's Crossing in Historic Nacogdoches

Picture of the Sitton Log House in Historic Nacogdoches

The Sitton Log House at Millard's Crossing in Historic Nacogdoches

The Sitton log house is the first of several early American structures that the visitor sees
on entering Millard's Crossing, a 37 acre complex of restored 19th century homes and buildings
resembling a small village that were brought together and arranged by Mrs. Albert Thomas in
1968. Built in 1843, the Sitton house is typical of log house construction that developed on the
American frontier between 1815 and 1880. Originating from Swedish, Finnish, and German prototypes,
log house construction spread from the Delaware valley through the southern states and into Texas by
pioneers and immigrant Indian groups.

The characteristic "dog-trot" house, known also as a "dog-run", "2P", "double pen", "saddlebag"
and "breezeway"
type, consists of 2 rooms of similar size separated by an open space in the middle called a
breezeway; a covered porch across the south side; a gabled roof on the ends; and one or two chimneys of ironstone
or sandstone finished at the top with smaller stones or brick. Here, the logs are planked on the side and contact only
where they meet at the corners with the technique of square notching. The chinking, or space between the logs, allowed
for inconsistencies of fit resulting from unseasoned timbers, tapering, and warping. The chinks were later filled with wood chips,
milled timber, stone fragments, moss, straw, grass, animal hairs, and bonded with various combinations of mud, clay, lime, or water.
The doors of the two rooms open into the breezeway and not onto the front of the structure which is elevated one to two feet above the
ground on stone and log pillars.


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