West View of the Old Train Station in Historic Nacogdoches

West View of the Old Train Station in Historic Nacogdoches

West View of the Old Train Station in Historic Nacogdoches

The Nacogdoches train station was constructed in the early 1900's following the pattern of many
railroad terminals built between 1880 and 1929 during the golden age of railroad development.
The unifying features are a one-story building set parallel to the tracks; an extruded or bay
window allowing visibility up and down the rails; and a wide overhanging bracketed roof.
In form the Nacogdoches depot is classical, but in style it is Victorian. The bay window on the
west and the pediment on the east are centered in the building, as doors and windows of equal
number are balanced on either side of a rectangular frame that is belted with three surrounds
continuing the tradition of classical symmetry. The decorative horizontal truss and accented
beams joined in an arrowhead on the eastern pediment; the bay window with crested cupola
on the west; the sinuous floral pattern of the roof brackets; the two small latticed windows
on the north; and the high gabled roof are Victorian characteristics.

At one time the station was part of a complex that included an express office, grocery store,
a freight depot, and a coal warehouse. In 1954 passenger service was discontinued. The station
is currently owned by the City of Nacogdoches, and in past years by the Union Pacific Railroad,
the Houston East and West Texas Railroad, the Texas and New Orleans Railroad, and the
Southern Pacific Line. The only marks on the exterior of the building are the steel doorway
thresholds manufactured by the Hartwell Iron Works of Houston Texas, and the 1920 U. S.
Coast and Geodetic Survey Bench Mark beneath the bay window identifying this location as
survey point number X68 with a elevation level of 285.77. Restoration of the depot is
planned with a grant from the Texas Department of Transportation and funds from the
City of Nacogdoches. The restoration/consultant architect is Gerald B. Bratz, Longview, Texas.


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